Risk for COVID-19 Infection, Hospitalization, and Death By Race/Ethnicity | CDC – CDC

Race and ethnicity are risk markers for other underlying conditions that affect health, including socioeconomic status, access to health care, and exposure to the virus related to occupation, e.g., frontline, essential, and critical infrastructure workers.
Note: Adjusting by age is important because risk of infection, hospitalization, and death is different by age, and age distribution differs by racial and ethnic group. If the effect of age is not accounted for, racial and ethnic disparities can be underestimated or overestimated.
1Data Source: Case level surveillance data from state, local and territorial public health jurisdictions (data through September 9, 2022). Numbers are ratios of age-adjusted rates standardized to the 2019 U.S. intercensal population estimate. Calculations use only the 65% of case reports that have race and ethnicity; this can result in inaccurate estimates of the relative risk among groups.
2 Data source: COVID-NET (March 1, 2020 through September 3, 2022). Numbers are ratios of age-adjusted rates standardized to the 2020 US standard COVID-NET catchment population.
3 Data Source: National Center for Health Statistics Provisional Death Counts (data through September 3, 2022). Numbers are ratios of age-adjusted rates standardized to the 2019 U.S. intercensal population estimate.
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