What Are Some Myths and Facts About Older Workers? – AARP

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En españolFact: According to a 2015 American Psychological Association study, older executives actually have higher “crystallized intelligence” — a combination of verbal ability and knowledge born of experience — than their younger counterparts. 
Fact: When comparing younger adults (age 20–31) with older adults (age 65–80) on 12 tasks, researchers found the latter group to be consistently more productive and reliable. They attribute this to the older adults having “learned strategies to solve the task, a constantly high motivation level as well as a balanced daily routine and stable mood.”
Fact: Although this may once have been true, recent surveys by the Pew Research Center have found that among those 65-plus, two-thirds use the internet (and 75 percent of them use it daily), 37 percent use at least one form of social media, and 42 percent own a smartphone.
Fact: According to a 12-year analysis of more than 21,000 people, published in 2016 by JAMA Internal Medicine, those 65-plus meeting the criteria for dementia actually declined from 11.6 percent in 2000 to 8.8 percent in 2012. 
Fact: According to the General Social Survey, the percentage of Americans who say they’re “very happy” is highest among those 65-plus, and some studies suggest they are the happiest age group at work. Elder activist Ashton Applewhite, author of This Chair Rocks, attributes this to “greater emotional maturity, adaptability to change and levels of well-being.” 
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